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Calabasas Courier Online

-22855 Mulholland Hwy. Calabasas, CA 91302-

Calabasas Courier Online

-22855 Mulholland Hwy. Calabasas, CA 91302-

Calabasas Courier Online

Opinion: Why we should keep handwritten assignments

Opinion%3A+Why+we+should+keep+handwritten+assignments
Caitlin Brockenbrow

Generation Z, born between 1997 and 2012, is going to school in the era of technology. Before Gen Z, however, Millennials and Generation X experienced a much different kind of education. Most of Gen Z have heard their parents’ snarky remarks on how difficult it was for them to access information at least once or twice—the library was their Google after all. However, as technology advances, schools have begun to make a push for digital resources. While technology like computers and iPads are very helpful, this era of nuance in education is uncharted waters when it comes to how it will impact students’ education in the future. 

Whether or not kids enjoy handwriting their essays and assignments is debatable, but whether it is the better alternative to typing is certainly not. Many scientific studies have shown that not only does handwriting connect more visual and motor networks in the brain, but it also increases information retention. When students take notes by hand, they, in turn, tend to study those notes before tests. The combination of reviewing the notes and handwriting them helps the student to score higher. This was proven in a study conducted with 67 students at Princeton where they were asked to take notes by hand during a lecture. When it came to conceptually understanding questions, students who took notes by hand scored higher on that portion of the exam. 

Recently, it was found that 86% of K-12 schools are using Google Classroom, showing that these technological advances have already begun to infiltrate educational institutions. This is not to say that these technologies have not improved and furthered education as these aids have allowed for the creation of more rigorous classes and improved studying. Yet despite all these advancements in technology, one thing that has remained consistent throughout all of the generations’  education is handwriting everything from notes to assignments, especially in English classes. 

In California, high schools require four years of English classes. That being said, almost every English class requires handwritten responses when it comes to essays, not to mention the percentage of students who take AP classes in high school. Not only do the AP tests require handwriting, they are extremely rigorous exams that often entail hours of writing by hand. In 2022, 34.6% of high school students took at least one AP test. If students are not properly prepared throughout the year, their exams will be even more difficult to pass. This will likely lead to physical and mental problems such as hand cramps and excessive stress. 

Ruling out handwriting in school curriculums would only prove to be a disadvantage to students. Handwriting in the classroom leads to enhanced memory retention as well as increased brain function, both of which add to the preparation handwriting provides AP students for their exams. Whether students are taking notes by hand or responding to prompts in their notebooks, the use of handwriting is crucial in all learning environments.

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About the Contributors
Sophia Vega, Staff Writer
Hi, my name is Sophia Vega and I look forward to writing on behalf of the school as a staff writer. Outside of school, I prioritize my family, friends, and other activities such as horseback riding, playing soccer, and spending time with my pets.
Caitlin Brockenbrow, Perspectives Editor
Hi! My name is Caitlin Brockenbrow, and I'm the Perspectives editor this year. Last year I was a staff writer and before that, I was head editor of my middle school newspaper and magazine for two years. Apart from articles, in my free time, I write creatively—mainly murder mysteries. English has always been my favorite subject, but besides reading and writing, I love theater, typewriters and drinking root beer floats.
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